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Book of the Month February 2020 Selection Time + Coupon!

The February selections are available now for Book of the Month!

Book of the Month is a monthly book subscription box. Every month, they reveal 5 new-release hardcover books, and subscribers can pick which book they want, or skip any month. (You also can add up to two more books to your box for $9.99 each)

COUPON: Use code SUN5 to get your first book for $9.99!

*Members will pay $14.99 when they sign up for a subscription that will renew monthly. They’ll also receive a credit for a free book at the time of this transaction (redeemable at any time).

Here are the February books:

The Girl with the Louding Voice by Abi Daré

Adunni is a fourteen-year-old Nigerian girl who knows what she wants: an education. This, her mother has told her, is the only way to get a “louding voice”—the ability to speak for herself and decide her own future. But instead, Adunni’s father sells her to be the third wife of a local man who is eager for her to bear him a son and heir.

When Adunni runs away to the city, hoping to make a better life, she finds that the only other option before her is servitude to a wealthy family. As a yielding daughter, a subservient wife, and a powerless slave, Adunni is told, by words and deeds, that she is nothing.

But while misfortunes might muffle her voice for a time, they cannot mute it. And when she realizes that she must stand up not only for herself, but for other girls, for the ones who came before her and were lost, and for the next girls, who will inevitably follow; she finds the resolve to speak, however she can—in a whisper, in song, in broken English—until she is heard.

Anna K by Jenny Lee

Meet Anna K. At seventeen, she is at the top of Manhattan and Greenwich society (even if she prefers the company of her horses and Newfoundland dogs); she has the perfect (if perfectly boring) boyfriend, Alexander W.; and she has always made her Korean-American father proud (even if he can be a little controlling). Meanwhile, Anna’s brother, Steven, and his girlfriend, Lolly, are trying to weather an sexting scandal; Lolly’s little sister, Kimmie, is struggling to recalibrate to normal life after an injury derails her ice dancing career; and Steven’s best friend, Dustin, is madly (and one-sidedly) in love with Kimmie.

As her friends struggle with the pitfalls of ordinary teenage life, Anna always seems to be able to sail gracefully above it all. That is…until the night she meets Alexia “Count” Vronsky at Grand Central. A notorious playboy who has bounced around boarding schools and who lives for his own pleasure, Alexia is everything Anna is not. But he has never been in love until he meets Anna, and maybe she hasn’t, either. As Alexia and Anna are pulled irresistibly together, she has to decide how much of her life she is willing to let go for the chance to be with him. And when a shocking revelation threatens to shatter their relationship, she is forced to question if she has ever known herself at all.

You Are Not Alone by Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen

You probably know someone like Shay Miller.
She wants to find love, but it eludes her.
She wants to be fulfilled, but her job is a dead end.
She wants to belong, but her life is so isolated.

You probably don’t know anyone like the Moore sisters.
They have an unbreakable circle of friends.
They live the most glamorous life.
They always get what they desire.

Shay thinks she wants their life.
But what they really want is hers.

American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins

Lydia Quixano Pérez lives in the Mexican city of Acapulco. She runs a bookstore. She has a son, Luca, the love of her life, and a wonderful husband who is a journalist. And while there are cracks beginning to show in Acapulco because of the drug cartels, her life is, by and large, fairly comfortable.

Even though she knows they’ll never sell, Lydia stocks some of her all-time favorite books in her store. One day, a man enters the shop to browse and comes up to the register with a few books he would like to buy―two of them are her favorites. Javier is erudite. He is charming. And, unbeknownst to Lydia, he is the jefe of a drug cartel that has taken over the city. When Lydia’s husband’s tell-all profile of Javier is published, none of their lives will ever be the same.

Forced to flee to beyond Javier’s reach, Lydia and her eight-year-old son Luca soon find themselves miles and worlds away from their comfortable middle-class existence. As they join the countless people trying to reach the United States, Lydia soon sees that everyone is running from something. But what exactly are they running to?

Note from Book of the Month:

Recently, there has been controversy and discussion on social media and in the press regarding this book, the way it has been marketed, its characterizations of Mexican immigrants, its author’s identity, and issues of cultural appropriation. Because of this, we wanted to share with you our thoughts about why it is one of our selections this month.

Our thinking around this book – both as a work of literature and as a political call to action – has evolved as the conversation around it has unfolded. When we first read the book, we thought it was an eye-opening and emotional depiction of one of the most important issues of our time. But in recent weeks, the perspectives that have been voiced have led us to engage more deeply with its limitations – especially given our current political climate.

Some of our members have expressed disappointment that we selected this book and have told us that we missed the mark by featuring it. Over the past week, our team has debated whether or not we should pull American Dirt from our site. While thoughtful people have raised important and valid criticisms of this book, we think it is more productive to encourage conversations around these issues than to sweep them under the rug. Ultimately, we believe that it is more honest to let you decide for yourself whether or not you would like to read this book than make that decision for you.

The Holdout by Graham Moore

It’s the most sensational case of the decade. Fifteen-year-old Jessica Silver, heiress to a billion-dollar real estate fortune, vanishes on her way home from school, and her teacher, Bobby Nock, is the prime suspect. The subsequent trial taps straight into America’s most pressing preoccupations: sex, law enforcement, and the lurid sins of the rich and famous. It’s an open-and-shut case for the prosecution, and a quick conviction seems all but guaranteed—until Maya Seale, a young woman on the jury, convinced of Nock’s innocence, persuades the rest of the jurors to return the verdict of not guilty, a controversial decision that will change all their lives forever.

Flash forward ten years. A true-crime docuseries reassembles the jury, with particular focus on Maya, now a defense attorney herself. When one of the jurors is found dead in Maya’s hotel room, all evidence points to her as the killer. Now, she must prove her own innocence—by getting to the bottom of a case that is far from closed.

As the present-day murder investigation weaves together with the story of what really happened during their deliberation, told by each of the jurors in turn, the secrets they have all been keeping threaten to come out—with drastic consequences for all involved.

What do you think of the spoilers this month? Which book are you picking?

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Posted in Book of the Month Spoilers, Subscription Box Spoilers| Tags: book of the month | 20 comments

Comments (20)

  1. I like that they include YA every now and then as a choice but nothing is calling my name this month.

  2. Really wished they shipped internationally 🙁

  3. I picked you are not alone. I just used my credit.

  4. Literature should not be censored nor should it be based solely on facts. Fiction is just that…fiction. Readers have the choice to support authors and books of their preference. But to boycott a book subscription over an individual choosing a specific book to showcase is narrowminded. Stop expecting authoritative figures to censor your choices for you.

    • Very well said. Agree with you.

    • I agree with this SO MUCH. I will make my own choices about what to read and how to feel about it. And I also don’t know that I agree literature should only be permitted to be written by own voices writers. SO MANY STORIES would never get told if that were the case. I chose American Dirt this month in large part because so many people are online telling me not to. And after I read that, I plan to read some own voices stories.

      But where is the line drawn? When is it okay to tell someone else’s story? Should no one tell stories about the Holocaust unless they were there? Should no one write about the Iraq War, the Civil Rights movement, Columbine, Sandy Hook, unless they were there?

      I understand in this case there are own voices writers also telling this story. But that doesn’t make Cummins wrong for wanting to tell it too. And if nothing else, this book has sparked a huge conversation about what is real and true for migrants, even if it’s because this book doesn’t tell that true story accurately. Perhaps this story will actually provide more of a stage for those going through the experience, because of the curiosity that has been piqued.

      • Agree 100%!

    • I’d like to just point out the real controversy…it’s not about how poorly it’s written. It’s that there is a very small window for Latinx authors already, especially ones from countries like Mexico, and this takes yet another spot away from them. Yes, Cummins identifies as Latinx…now, and she is certainly entitled to a journey of discovery her identity, but the fact still stands that she is telling others stories without all the facts. There are SO many latinx authors who have written about their immigration stories who deserve her space. 100% DESERVE.
      I’d also like to point out that we all pay membership fees to BOTM…with a high profile book, esp one with Oprah’s book club and therefore Oprah’s branding, this cost BOTM more than the usual selections. All our fees went into this disaster.
      I don’t support banning books, but I think if people really wanted to seek this out, they could have. My local library has it.

    • Agreed.

    • I think you’ve missed the point. I don’t support the censorship of literature, which would mean that this book or parts of it wouldn’t make it to press or would be pulled from bookshelves everywhere. We do however live in a free market society in which money talks. I don’t support BOTM’s choice this month because there are so many similar, relevant books that are written by latinx authors and they are better than this one. I expect BOTM to be capable of making that choice as well. They are an influencer and can and should do better. If they pulled the book (frankly it’s questionable that they all read it and selected it to begin with) it would still be available wherever books are sold. Curation is not censorship. BOTM is supposed to be a curated service by a group of well-read and intelligent judges, not an extension of the publishers. Nothing shows the sad state of the publishing industry like giving a woman with a mediocre book a huge advance, a bunch of press, and features in Oprah and BOTM, while brilliant books by poc aren’t nearly as supported. It’s embarrassing.

  5. I selected The Holdout. Curious to see what the author of The Imitation Game has up his sleeve with a fictional story.

  6. I like there write up on why they kept American Dirt. It is up to the person to choose if they want it.

    • I like that they responded to the criticisms openly. I think a good idea would be to offer a 6th book, one written by a Latinx author on the same topic and genre, literary fiction. Then subscribers could choose the book written by a person with direct experience or exposure to the story contained within American Dirt if they so choose. This would offer more choices than just reading American Dirt or not and would support a Latinx author.

      • The author identifies as white and Latina.

  7. Skipped due to them offering American Dirt, and to a much lesser extent, more YA. There’s a BOTM YA subscription, I’m wondering why they are including it in the regular box as well.

    • I am an adult that enjoys reading YA from time to time. I think its nice they occasionally offer YA, since I wouldn’t want it every month. Agreed about American Dirt, that was an easy pass for me, but some of the other options were already on my to read list.

  8. I chose Anna K. I need some fluffy reads this month!🤣

  9. I like reading this and reserve them at my library for free 🙂

  10. Wow, I bet they’re regretting picking American Dirt right about now.

    Nothing appealed to me this month, so I skipped.

  11. After reading all the samples I picked American dirt. Seems to be controversial already based on polarized reviews.

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