Snakku Subscription Box Review + Coupon – May 2017


This post may contain referral/affiliate links. If you buy something, MSA may earn a commission. Read the full disclosure.

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Snakku is a Japanese snack subscription box that sends a mix of hand-picked, authentic snacks you can only find in Japan as well as more familiar selections. Subscriptions help sustain local Japanese snack shops, some of which have been around for hundreds of years. Plus, it’s easy to pause, skip, or cancel.

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Every box is wrapped in traditional reusable washi furoshiki wrap.

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Snakku has two subscription sizes: the regular snack box ($38.95/month) and the Tasting Box ($15.75/month).

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

This box was sent to us at no cost for review. (Check out the review process post  to learn more about how we review boxes.)

This is a review of the regular, $38.95 per month, box.

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

The Subscription Box: Snakku

The Cost: $38.95 per month + free U.S. shipping (discounts for 3 or 6-month subscriptions), and the Tasting Box is $15.75 per month.

Products: A mix of authentic Japanese snacks only found in Japan and more familiar/classic snacks.

Ships to: USA (free shipping), Canada ($5 shipping), and Australia, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, U.K. ($15 shipping)

Check out all of our Snakku reviews and the Snacks Subscription Box Directory!

Keep Track of Your Subscriptions: Add this box to your subscription list or wishlist!

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Each box includes an info card. May is all about the snacks of Hiroshima.

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Lemon Chocolate Cookie

Snakku explains that Hiroshima is the lemon capital of Japan, and this lemony cookie has been made there for over 100 years. I’ve never had anything quite like this. Unlike conventional cookies made from milk and flour, this is made from skimmed milk powder. Hence, the texture is like that of powdered milk. The cool part is that it literally melts in your mouth like silky chocolate. The flavor is complex too. It’s very delicately sweet, and the lemon is a mere whisper in the back of my nose. It’s just mysterious enough to leave me wanting more.

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Touyouka Manju

This is a red bean flavored manju, which is a traditional Japanese snack that has its confectionary roots in China. The red bean filling is sweet, dense, and filling but never overwhelming. I especially like the cake-like shell, which offsets some of the denseness of the filling.

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Shakushi Senbei

This is a sweet senbei that is exclusively sold at Miyajima shrine in Hiroshima. It is shaped like a ladle that’s used at the shrine which is said to bring good luck and prosperity to the wielder. It tastes like a thin, crispy butter cookie. In other words, it’s delicious!

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Hiroshima Leaf Sable

These cookies are shaped like Hiroshima’s maple tree leaves. I love how crunchy and buttery each bite is! The sweetness is definitely there but it’s more refined, more subtle than the shortbread cookies I like to eat stateside.

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

AmeYu

This powder makes a ginger-infused malt syrup drink. According to Snakku, when mixed into hot water it can be great for when you come down with a cold. Now, ginger and I have a long history of mutual disdain, but this infusion is ok. It’s essentially sugar water with a gingery aftertaste. Would I seek this out for myself? No. But I do see ginger in a new light.

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Oyster Senbei

These flat senbei crackers are made from whole dried oysters. The taste is interesting. It’s good, yes, but not what I was expecting. If I didn’t know any better I’d think they’re dried mushrooms. However, I’m not a food connoisseur by any means, so I may just be crazy.

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Sonomanma Lemon

These are freeze-dried lemon peels covered in sugar crystals and honey. If you like candied fruit, this snack is a must have! The lemon rind is surprisingly sharp and zesty as if it’s freshly peeled. I also like how the warm honey undertones balance out the zest.

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Miso Scallion Senbei

This senbei snack is made with seaweed, miso, and Hokkaido scallions. The first word that comes to my mind is pungent. I really like the sweet yet savory glaze, and the sharp taste of scallion really kicks the flavors up a notch. In fact, this is one of the tastiest senbei crackers I’ve had in recent memory.

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Hon-Wasabi Mix

This snack mix consists of crunchy rice crackers and peanuts, both covered in real wasabi powder. If my relationship with ginger is a feud, then wasabi and I would be at constant war. The spice level is very mild but it’s about as much as I can handle. On the plus side, the rice cracker pieces are satisfyingly crunchy. I don’t hate it but I probably wouldn’t eat it again.

Snakku Japanese Snack Box - Hiroshima - May 2017

Cheese Stuffed Senbei

These are baked soy sauce senbei crackers with a smooth, creamy cheese filling. The overall flavor is mild compared to the Miso Scallion Senbei and Hon-Wasabi Mix, which allows me to appreciate the subtleties in the flavor of the cheese filling. I’m a huge fan!

Verdict: This Snakku took me on a flavor roller coaster ride! I wasn’t a fan of everything (I’m looking at you, wasabi) but I still loved the tasting experience. My favorite snack, the Lemon Chocolate Cookie, has been made in Hiroshima for 100 years, and yet I am just now discovering its extraordinary flavors and texture! It’s quite humbling. There are 18 snacks total so the cost breaks down to about $2.16 apiece. While it is a pricey subscription, the indulgent snacking experience, and fantastic curation makes it worth it for me.

What do you think of Snakku?

How do subscribers rate Snakku Snack Box?

2 subscribers rated this subscription
3.6
out of 5 stars
Shipping
Customer service
Retail value
Quality of products
Curation
Ease of canceling

Do you subscribe to Snakku Snack Box? Add your rating now!


Written by Nancy Su

Nancy Su

Nancy used to be a Candy Crush addict but then she became addicted to subscription boxes instead. Now she has a particular interest in Korean/Asian beauty after seeing the wonders it has done to her skin. She’s constantly in search of new lippies, skincare, and tasty international snacks.

Posted in Australian Subscription Box Reviews, Canadian Subscription Box Reviews, Food Subscription Boxes, Snakku Reviews, Subscription Box Reviews, UK Subscription Box Reviews| Tags: snakku | snakku tasting | 1 comment

1 Comment

  1. Thanks for the review! I’ve been eyeing this for a while and finally took the plunge. Can’t wait to try it out.

    For anyone thinking about subbing, the ADDICTION code takes 5% off any length sub, not just the first box. So for example, the 3-mo sub comes to $109.73 (instead of $115.50).

Post a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comments may not appear immediately. More info here.

Please do not enter your email address in the Name field or in the comment content!

*

 
 

Get alerts on your desktop for the best deals and spoilers!