Posted by on in RescueBox Reviews, Subscription Box Reviews, Subscription Boxes for Dogs | Tags: | 6 comments

RescueBox Dog Subscription Box Review – February 2017

This post may contain referral/affiliate links. Read the full disclosure.

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Rescue Box is a subscription box for dogs or cats. For dogs, choose from small (up to 20 pounds), medium (20-50 pounds), and large (50+ pounds). They are associated with Greater Good (the folks who brought you The Hunger Site, The Animal Rescue Site, and more) and your purchase of a subscription will help provide food and vaccines to shelter pets!

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My Subscription Addiction paid for this box. (Check out the review process post to learn more about how we review boxes.)

This review is of the Large Dog, $29.95 a month, box. For reference, my dog Nyx is an 84-pound Rottweiler.

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The Subscription Box: Rescue Box

The Cost: $29.95 a month + free shipping

The Products: Toys and treats for your pet and accessories for pet lovers

Ships to: U.S.

Check out all of my Rescue Box reviews and lots of other great boxes for dogs and cats in the Pet Subscription Box Directory!

Keep Track of Your Subscriptions: Add this box to your subscription list or wishlist!

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Included was an information card about the items in the box and more information on Rescue Box’s charity efforts. There was also a card this month highlighting a monthly theme.

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St. Pat’s Beer Mug by Preppy Puppy – Listed Value $6.99

Preppy Puppy is a wholesale supplier so I used the value from the information card. All their treats are made in the U.S. and are free of wheat, corn, and soy. (For the record, this was carefully wrapped in bubble wrap and was not loose in the box.) This looks good enough for ME to eat…

Rib Roller by Jones Natural Chews – Value $3.99

These are beef ribs with pork skin wrapped around them. They are made in the USA, as well. Although the item description at various websites says these are good for small-to-medium dogs, they are actually fairly large. Of course, please be sure to supervise your dog with any chew of this sort.

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FireBiterz by Outward Hound – Value $12.99

The base of these is fire hose material and it is pretty durable, although you can’t assume anything will be completely safe with Nyx. In fact, she has put holes in toys from this product line before. However, this one held up pretty well last night. A three-squeaker version is also available!

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Zuke’s PureNZ Cuts in Beef with Green Lipped Mussel (5 oz) – Value $7.19

Treats and food from New Zealand are super expensive (Mr. Kitty eats lamb/rabbit food from NZ). But they are also really high quality. These are grain free and the only animal protein sources are beef and green lipped mussel, so if your dog is sensitive to chicken or pork or something, these could work for you.

Brew Sticks by Brew Buddies (6 oz) – Value $5.96

These are from Omega Paw, the same company responsible for the Meowjito and Meowgarita cat treats. (For what it’s worth, not ALL of their products are alcohol inspired. In this case, these have malted barley. Just don’t give actual beer to dogs; hops are toxic to dogs.) These also have poultry and rice ingredients, so they are probably not the best for dogs with food allergies or intolerances. These treats are made in the USA.

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Here is Nyx, enjoying the toy.

Verdict: I calculated a value of $37.12 for February’s Rescue Box. That is above the month-to-month cost of the subscription. This month was kind of treat-heavy; other months have more of a mix of items. If you have a relatively healthy dog with no food allergies/sensitivities, this could be a fun box for you, and the value is nearly always there. If your dog has some food issues, you may want to look elsewhere, though.

What do you think of the February 2017 Rescue Box dog subscription box? Do you subscribe to any dog or cat boxes?

Written by Ragan Buckley

Ragan Buckley

Ragan stumbled across My Subscription Addiction in late 2013 and immediately subscribed to way too many beauty boxes. She’s now focused on boxes for her cats and dog, vegan/vegetarian food boxes, and craft subscriptions (and she didn’t give up beauty boxes entirely).

All views in this review are the opinion of the author. My Subscription Addiction will never accept payment in exchange for a review, but will accept a box at no cost to provide honest opinions on the box. This post may contain affiliate/referral links. Read the complete My Subscription Addiction disclosure.

6 Comments

  1. I ordered two Rescue Boxes through Groupon.
    The first one arrived in four days–full of high quality treats, two Old English Sheepdog-proof toys and a bandana.
    I ordered both boxes the same day, yet, the second box was not delivered at all. Their tracking number showed that they both should have arrived on the same date.
    BEST CUSTOMER SERVICE: Cindy, from the company sent me out another box–free of charge. I did not have to wait or prove anything. She just sent me another when she heard my disappointment!

  2. That first picture of Nyx is a favorite. She looks like you are taking naked baby pictures.
    Like ” Really mom another one??”

  3. I came to MSA for beauty and cat box reviews. But slowly, I began to read dog box reviews featuring Nyx, and ended up spending too much time trying to figure out how long various toys would last in Nyx’s mandibles of doom. I am not a dog person by any stretch, but I began to mentally design toys that would actually last. Are there statistics on Nyx and various toys, correlated to material and design? What toy and material lasted longest?

    • Things that last the longest are usually made from rubber that is kind of hard. So, like the original KONG toys and similar.

      Plushes last the least amount of time. Tennis balls, it depends — the real ones made for actually playing tennis are better than the ones made for dogs.

    • I don’t mean to butt in but I have a 55lb beast of a mutt that reminds me alot of Nyx so I purposely search out his reviews to compare and get some insight or ideas for good toys. Haha. I’m subscribed to BullyMake and just started BarkBox for Super Chewers since we’ve literally gone through every toy I thought stood a chance in pet stores in a 20 mile radius. The only toys that LAST with my dog are the hard rubber ones (Kong is my friend) but he seems to get bored with those easily since he can’t destroy them. So those usually have to be interactive toys or I have to stuff them with treats to get him engaged. Otherwise they will sit on the floor forever and he’ll never choose them by himself. He does like chew toys (Nylabone type hard plastic things) but only when he’s in the mood to lay around and chew…they aren’t really fun “toys.” So obviously the ones he loves the best are the fabric ones in which he spends alot of time and energy disassembling (he’s literally undone stitching along seams!!!) or digging into trying to get the squeakers out. “Standard” fabric toys or stuffed animals are destroyed typically within 2 minutes. Total waste of money and a complete mess. The ones made out of “firehose” material or that claim to be “ballistic” or “extra strength material” will usually hold out maybe 10 minutes before a squeaker is coming out of a hole, but in general he will carry around the carcass for the next few days and slowly pick the rest apart. Actually, a Kong Wubba (two different sized balls covered with a durable material) was one of the first toys recommeded to me so I bought one and when he had the balls taken out within a half an hour I was initially mad. But to be honest, the large squeaky ball STILL squeaks about 8 months later (by far the only sqeaky ball he’s had that survived anywhere near that long) and he even still has the octopus-type leftover legs of material that he loves to carry around and we play tug-of-war with. So the key is to give up trying to keep toys in one piece or as they are intended to be and just find ones that at least parts of can last longer than an hour! Haha.

  4. I love pics of your doggy. Always makes me smile, thank you!

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